Outdoors In: Irideeën

My cup of tea by Iris of Irideeën

I’ve never been a fan of stark, unpainted white walls because I’ve always thought they were drab and lacked life. But lately I’ve been keeping an open mind about them. Iris of Irideeën (which translates to “Iridieas”) makes white walls look fabulous. Her entire home is a testament to the fact that white walls are not boring. Graceful and airy, Iris’s house has wonderful accents of vibrant color that really pop off the bright and clean white walls.

I’m quite taken with her workspace and her inspiration board — it’s rendered me speechless. So much beauty to behold in her home. Be sure to check out Iris’s blog for even more photos of her interior spaces.

Iris' daughter's room

[image above]: This is my daughter’s room (she is almost 4). I wanted to add a bit of quirkiness to her room, hence the small antler, the mushroom (which is actually a lamp) and the plastic rabbit (which is very kitsch, but I like it!). I painted the base of the antler in the same color as the cabinet (Charleston gray by Farrow & Ball) to let it blend in with the rest of the room.

mimosa flowers

[image above]: These are mimosa flowers, I bought them at our local flower store. I am fortunate to live in a country where flowers are available throughout the year for reasonable prices. I really need to have fresh flowers in our home (nomen est omen when you are named Iris), so buy a few bunches every week.

Bookshelf from Irideen

[image above]: I bought the rabbit for Easter last year. It is a candle and I liked it so much I kept it on display for the rest of the year. The two little bronze birds were a gift from a sweet friend. I bought the deer in Vienna last year. The white bird has a little led-light in it, I bought it at the very Dutch store Hema. The upside down cup is by one of my favorite Dutch designers Lenneke Wispelwey. 

animal and flowers from Irideeen

[image above]: I like to place little animals throughout the house. This one has a temporary spot at the base of the lamp, but it can have a different home next week. On this cabinet I placed some hyacinths, a small white spray painted branch and some blossoming branches. I like a single variety of flowers in a vase or pot, I find they are often more powerful together than if they are used in a bouquet with many other flowers. I am not a big fan of traditional bouquets and I always remove the green leaves many florists put in to add volume. Let the flowers speak for themselves!

butterfly and feather from Irideeen

[image above]: I bought the ceramic feather in Vienna, it is actually a Christmas ornament. I like the softness and delicate structure of it. The butterfly is made of feathers too, it is so light and ready to air.

Iris's workspace

[image above]: I change my inspiration board once in a while, to have a different view while I am behind my computer. This time, I used the bird poster by Chacha as a base, and added some cards, magazine clippings and small items in the same color scheme. There is also a picture of my bridal bouquet, some cards by Het Bos and many bird items; I use them a lot in my styling.

Living room mantle from Irideeen

[image above]: This is the mantle in our living room. I created this display last Christmas. I taped and spray painted different jars and also painted some dried branches in the same gold. I added a vintage bird poster, some ceramic animals and mushrooms and a birch log. And voila; a gilded forest!

Wall graphics in Iris' son's bedroom

[image above]: This is my son’s bedroom. We added two wallpaper animals by Inke. They are available many animal shapes and in all kinds of different vintage patterns. The rocking moose is by Ikea and a big hit with the children. 

About Donaville Herrick

Donaville is the Founder of Dearest Nature and also Co-Founder and Creative Director of Hello Hello Hi. When visions of nature and web design aren't dancing in her head, she enjoys spending time with her three munchkins, baking cupcakes, and trying her hand at various crafts. Follow her on Twitter to stay updated with her day-to-day musings.

Plad

The gorgeous shop Plad is full of whimsical, delightful, handmade pieces. From the sculpted acorns to mini elf slippers, Plad makes me think of trips into the deepest forests and excursions foraging for plants and fairies alike.

products by Plad

I love the journals made with handmade paper infused with herbs and flowers. What a lovely place to tuck away little thoughts about life and store sketches from you wanderings!

All photos via Plad

About Jasmine Flamenco

Jasmine is a maker, crafter, ceramicist, wife, knitter, origami amateur, and Master Chef in the making (if Master Chef only included making vegetarian food). Visit her blog for lively inspiration.

Photography by Mister Onüff

Macro shot of a butterfly wing by Mister Onüff

Artist Info

  • Name: Mister Onüff
  • Based in: Madrid, Spain
  • Visit his work on Behance or portfolio

Nature through the eyes of Madrid, Spain-based José María Parra Sánchez, or Mister Onüff, is enrapturing. José is a creative director and founder of a design company based in Madrid, Spain, though he’s from a small village on the island of Ölandin in Sweden. He captures the finest of details in nature that elicit many an ooh and ahh.

details by mr. onuff

Mister Onüff’s macro photography is quite exceptional, too. It sparks an ache in me to take up macro photography, something that I dabbled in a little bit of in high school and college. My camera at the time had incredible macro capabilities that I would go out on a limb and say could rival some of the most expensive macro lenses. The only problem, however, was that I couldn’t fine-tune any settings because there really weren’t any settings on my point and shoot.

macro photography by Mr. Onuff

I’m captivated by the dream-like qualities of many of Mister Onüff’s photos. Each photo from his Botanic Garden set look like a still from a dream sequence, so soothing and the sort of thing you’d want to look at before you nod off at night.

Botanic Garden by Mister Onüff

To learn more about the fantastic Mister Onüff, read his bio on his portfolio.

About Donaville Herrick

Donaville is the Founder of Dearest Nature and also Co-Founder and Creative Director of Hello Hello Hi. When visions of nature and web design aren't dancing in her head, she enjoys spending time with her three munchkins, baking cupcakes, and trying her hand at various crafts. Follow her on Twitter to stay updated with her day-to-day musings.

Throwback to the ’70s | Purslane and Dish Gardens

Purslane photo by Amy Renea

Dearest Nature,

Thank you for purslane. Thank you for a weed that is everywhere you look (once you start looking) that tastes like lemons and limes and a little bit of pepper. Thank you offering up this delicious plant in zones where lemon trees won’t grow outdoors. Oh, and thanks for loading it with more omega 3′s than a cup of spinach.

Readers — meet purslane.

(If you would like the full nutrition workup on purslane, just click here.)

This little plant is probably growing in your backyard. Look in cracks in the driveway or in your potting soil from last year. The seeds are notorious for getting in there. (Good for them! They have spunk!) The plant rips out easily as a weed, but beware … when you rip out purslane it goes into survival mode. For a plant, that means make seed. Once you rip out that little weed, it will quickly make untold amounts of seed and propagate itself all over your garden. That in itself is not a terrible thing if you learn how to harvest and eat it. Just beware — yes?

I grow purslane in dish gardens. In a throwback to the ways of the ’70s, dish gardens are simply miniature gardens in a dish. Simple, yes? The real catch to a successful dish garden is to NOT overwater the plants. The water cannot drain and the only escape is evaporation, so water lightly and only as needed.

purslane

To propagate purslane, simply cut or pull off a stem 1″-3″ long and push the broken stem into the soil. Watch and wait and you will soon have another purslane plant.

To harvest purslane, pinch the leaves where they meet the stem with your fingertips. Once you get a feel for how the little succulent leaves snap off, you can simply run your fingernail along the stem and take off the leaves from an entire stem (similar to harvesting thyme).

purslane

When you are preparing to eat purslane, make sure you have the right plant! Purslane has a succulent red stem and little paddle shaped leaves. It looks somewhat like euphorbias which harbor toxic “milk”, so again — beware. If you break the stem of purslane, a clear liquid will emerge. If the liquid is white, wash your hands (Euphorbia milk can cause a rash like Posion Ivy) and DO NOT eat it!

purslane and chive potato salad

When you do get the right plant, integrate it into any recipes where you want a little citrus kick. I chop it up and use it with fresh chives on my famous potato salad. Terrible for the hips, but divine on the lips!

About Amy Renea

Amy is a freelance photographer and writer based out of Hershey, PA. She spends her days chasing children and chickens around the back yard, sipping on dandelion tea and munching on sweet potato chips. Come visit the Nest for All Seasons to learn more about her food, photography, DIY designs and modern garden living!

The Angry Weather

Thunderbolt and lightning! Very very frightning, me!

One of my favorite songs since childhood is Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” … so much so that throughout high school and college, my screen name on aol instant messenger (does anyone even use that anymore?) was Venetian Rhapsody — sadly, the name Bohemian Rhapsody was already taken. But Venetian Rhapsody was a nice alternative.

I loved the range of Freddy Mercury’s voice and how theatrical Queen’s musical style was. I think the only band that comes close to Queen as far as theatrics in vocals are concerned is Muse, though feel free to enlighten me as my musical tastes have been limited to Yo Gabba Gabba songs or the theme song to Dora the Explorer as of late.

I started humming “Bohemian Rhapsody” in my head, and probably out loud with a little bit of really awful air guitar, while perusing Iveth Morales’ shop, The Angry Weather. Set against a backdrop of geodes, these jewels are so rock and roll. Quite magnifico, oh oh oh. Oh Mama Mia! Some of her product photos transport me to the land before time … or at least the land before my time, in the early ’80s.

jewelry by The Angry Weather

Pretty rad, right? For more angry weather jewelry, hop over to Iveth’s shop.

About Donaville Herrick

Donaville is the Founder of Dearest Nature and also Co-Founder and Creative Director of Hello Hello Hi. When visions of nature and web design aren't dancing in her head, she enjoys spending time with her three munchkins, baking cupcakes, and trying her hand at various crafts. Follow her on Twitter to stay updated with her day-to-day musings.