Eco-Friendly Birdcage Centerpiece

Photo by Donaville Herrick

Supplies

  • 3 – 4 pages from a book
  • 1/2 sheet of 12″ x 12″ kraft paper
  • 3 – 4 twigs
  • bobbin
  • birdcage
  • scissors
  • glue (I used a glue gun)

This week’s DIY combines my love of two things: paper and nature. I bought a simple, unadorned small birdcage candle holder from Michael’s a little while ago and I’ve been meaning to do something with it besides sticking a tea light in it or hanging it from the ceiling (though I still might do the latter). I thought about trying my hand at creating a terrarium and growing sprouts perhaps, but I didn’t have much luck growing sprouts and terrariums can be quite messy if not contained in a jar or something providing full enclosure around the sides.

I knew I wanted to incorporate butterflies somehow, so I did a bit of research and happened upon this sensational butterfly terrarium by Sweet Paul, found via Emmaline Bride. I gathered a few twigs from the backyard, a few pages from an old book I’ve been upcycling this past month, a bobbin, and half a sheet of kraft paper (one of my favorite papers to work with) and got to work on creating a simple and eco-friendly bird cage centerpiece.

Directions

supplies & directions / photos by Donaville Herrick

1. Cut flower petals from your book pages and kraft paper (roughly 1/4″ wide by 1/2″ tall for the book pages and 3/4″ by 2″ tall for the kraft paper) and cut out three butterflies out of the book pages (roughly 3″ wide by 2″ tall).

2. Fashion flowers out of all the book page and kraft paper petals. I glued together five petals to form each flower, glueing the bottom right corner front of each petal to the bottom left corner backside of another petal. Glue together all three layers of the butterflies (not pictured).

3. Combine the book page petals with the kraft paper petals.

4. Glue a single twig (without any excess branches) to the bobbin and glue the bobbin

to the bottom of the votive holder. The bobbin gives the entire structure stability, so you don’t have to glue the twig directly to the bottom of the votive holder. Some bobbins don’t have hollow centers like the one I used, so you might have to drill a hole in the center, wide enough that the twig will fit inside. Slide the votive holder in place at the bottom of the birdcage and twist to lock.

5. Glue other twigs to the single twig. And make sure the twigs are firmly in place before you start attaching any flowers onto the piece.

6. Glue flowers along the twigs and spread them out evenly or cluster them if you like.

7. Enjoy your centerpiece!

If you aren’t planning a party or wedding anytime soon, never fear, this lovely birdcage centerpiece would make a nice addition to your bookshelf, your dining room table, suspended above your kitchen sink, in the corner of your office, or any place your heart desires.

About Donaville Herrick

Donaville is the Founder of Dearest Nature and also Co-Founder and Creative Director of Hello Hello Hi. When visions of nature and web design aren't dancing in her head, she enjoys spending time with her three munchkins, baking cupcakes, and trying her hand at various crafts. Follow her on Twitter to stay updated with her day-to-day musings.

Eggcellent Ideas

Paper Easter eggs / Photos by Donaville Herrick

I love crafting with my little dearests. My oldest, three-and-a-half-year-old Madeline, whom we call Maddy for short, drops everything she’s doing to create anything out of paper. Yesterday Maddy and I made a few paper Easter eggs together, ones that looked like they could have been made during the 1980s, especially had we added a bits of neon colors like green and pink. My other two children, twin twenty-one-month-olds, usually like playing with and wreaking havoc upon the crafts Maddy and I create, so only three out of the four paper eggs we created yesterday survived. None to worry, there’s still time before the weekend to make a few more.

This Saturday we will be dyeing eggs. It will be the first time for my little ones and I can already picture the fun and mess and bubble bath that will ensue once the dyeing egg-stravaganza is over. This is the sort of fun they got into with finger-painting a few months ago … cleanup is going to be so much fun!

For those of you with kids, what are your plans this Easter weekend? Any egg dyeing and egg hunting involved?

If you’re scratching your head for ideas, here are a handful egg-cellent Easter crafts to consider trying this weekend:

10 DIY Easter egg ideas

Not enough Easter egg ideas? Check out this post by our contributor Anastasia Marie and this post over at papernstitch blog.

About Donaville Herrick

Donaville is the Founder of Dearest Nature and also Co-Founder and Creative Director of Hello Hello Hi. When visions of nature and web design aren't dancing in her head, she enjoys spending time with her three munchkins, baking cupcakes, and trying her hand at various crafts. Follow her on Twitter to stay updated with her day-to-day musings.

A Happy, Rainy, Cloudy DIY Roundup

Hello there! I’m Clemence from Oh The Lovely Things and I can’t say how excited I am to be sharing my first post here today.

Seeing spring coming and nature awakening makes my heart sing, but I know May flowers don’t come without April showers. The nice thing is rainy days don’t have to be gloomy!

Here are seven (including the one above) rain-inspired DIY projects that will brighten up the cloudier days.

April DIY Roundup by Clemence Herbillon of Oh The Lovely Things

About Clemence Herbillon

Clemence is a blogger, jewelry designer and school teacher based in Switzerland, Europe. She was raised in the French countryside with five siberian husky dogs, and kept an unconditional love for nature and all living creatures since then. She is obsessed with all things pretty and enjoys getting lost in the vortex of fashion, design, art, and inspiration blogs, as well as working on her own blog, Oh The Lovely Things, where she shares her creative projects and documents what inspires her each day.